Think you don't have time or the room to make compost? Japanese 'Bokashi' or fermentation composting is perfect for those who are short on time and space.


So, what is Bokashi?

Bokashi is a sealed, anaerobic (without air) method of fermenting organic waste. There is no offensive odour, no access for cockroaches or mice and very little effort required. Here’s how to make your very own Bokashi composter.

Making Your Own Bokashi Compost Bin


What you'll need

Bokashi-style bucket with tap to drain liquid, internal strainer, compression tool and tight fitting lid
Bokashi microbe-enhanced fermenting agent
Organic waste such as tea bags, coffee grounds, vegetable and fruit peelings, meat left overs (Bokashi is the only compost method where meat can be added) or other kitchen waste

How to make it

Step 1
Set up your Bokashi bucker in a convenient place (kitchen bench, balcony or courtyard)
Step 2
Add kitchen waste and compress it with the tool provided with the bin
Step 3
Cover the waste with the microbe-enhanced Bokashi mix
Step 4
Replace the lid
Step 5
Repeat the process every time you add more organic waste

Making Your Own Bokashi Compost Bin

What you'll need

Bokashi-style bucket with tap to drain liquid, internal strainer, compression tool and tight fitting lid
Bokashi microbe-enhanced fermenting agent
Organic waste such as tea bags, coffee grounds, vegetable and fruit peelings, meat left overs (Bokashi is the only compost method where meat can be added) or other kitchen waste

How to make it

Step 1 Set up your Bokashi bucker in a convenient place (kitchen bench, balcony or courtyard)
Step 2 Add kitchen waste and compress it with the tool provided with the bin
Step 3 Cover the waste with the microbe-enhanced Bokashi mix
Step 4 Replace the lid
Step 5 Repeat the process every time you add more organic waste
Bokashi Composting Bin

Photo Credit: Annette McFarlane

Using liquid compost

Turn on the tap to release the concentrated compost juice. Collect it in a watering can or bucket. Dilute with water to the colour of weak tea and apply this nourishing tonic to your plants.

Using fermented compost

When the Bokashi bucket is completely full (you absolutely cannot squeeze any more in), empty it into a conventional compost bin or simply dig a hole anywhere in the garden and bury it to complete the decomposing process. This will improve your soil and release nutrients to surrounding plants.

Add less compostable waste to the wheelie bin, get free nutrients for your plants and do your bit for the environment by becoming a Bokashi composter!

Want a chance to win your very own bokashi start-up kit along with a whole bunch of other goodies? Make sure you enter the Live for Less competition here. Don’t forget to tell your family and friends about it too!